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Roche introduces a Remote Patient Monitoring solution
Published on 21 September 2020

Roche introduces a Remote Patient Monitoring solution at the 56th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes

  • The Remote Patient Monitoring solution is an element of the RocheDiabetes Care Platform helping healthcare professionals to provide care when and where it is needed, thus enabling a more efficient and personalised approach to diabetes care
  • By building a bridge between the doctor’s office and people with diabetes going about their everyday lives, the Remote Patient Monitoring solution facilitates an ongoing relationship between healthcare professionals and people with diabetes.

Basel, 21 September 2020 - Roche presents a Remote Patient Monitoring solution that enables healthcare professionals to monitor people with diabetes outside of conventional care settings. It represents a milestone towards Roche’s vision of integrated Personalised Diabetes Management (iPDM) by providing healthcare professionals with a more comprehensive picture in-between doctor’s visits. The Remote Patient Monitoring solution can be especially helpful to people with diabetes who require more regular doctor-patient interaction or who struggle to self-manage their condition such as adhering to their medication scheme. Furthermore, it can support people with diabetes who are at high risk of incurring disease complications. The solution is being introduced at the 56th Annual  Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD).

The Remote Patient Monitoring solution is a new element of the RocheDiabetes Care Platform using its pattern detection feature, along with data integrated from diabetes management solutions like the mySugr app and devices such as blood glucose meters or insulin pumps. Healthcare professionals are able to enrol their patients in a Remote Patient Monitoring programme and personalise the solution for patients’ needs (e.g. programme length, frequency of data upload, hyperglycaemia trends or standard deviation). Based on patients’ shared data as well as the predefined rules and patterns, the care team receives alerts on irregularities. The care team is able to monitor patients’ health and record observations or directly communicate therapy adjustments with the patients via a secure and private messaging service. In this way, the Remote Patient Monitoring solution helps healthcare professionals to provide care when and where it is needed, thus to take a more efficient and personalised approach to diabetes care. 

In parallel, enrolled participants have the option to request support or share additional information. Alerts remind them of treatment plans supporting their daily therapy management. By building a bridge between the doctor’s office and people with diabetes going about their everyday lives, the solution enables a continued relationship between healthcare professionals and people with diabetes. Enrolled participants are likely to feel more accountable and more supported knowing that their healthcare team is aware of their current state of health without geographical boundaries.

The number of new diabetes cases has been steadily increasing over the past few decades.1 Healthcare systems and providers are facing continual pressure to deliver an improved quality of care at a lower cost while treating an increasing number of people with diabetes. “Monitoring people with diabetes outside of conventional care settings can be part of the solution to this challenge. Diabetes is well-suited to remote care, and our goal is to seamlessly connect healthcare professionals and people with diabetes,” said Marcel Gmuender, Head of Roche Diabetes Care. “Lately, the COVID-19 pandemic has shown that there is a growing need for telehealth. It is becoming more important than ever for people with diabetes to be supported in their self-management and connected to their care team. The Remote Patient Monitoring solution of the RocheDiabetes Care Platform is a powerful tool to provide adequate coverage to people with diabetes and ease the burden on healthcare teams.” 

References
[1] “Diabetes.” World Health Organization. Retrieved from: www.who.int/health-topics/diabetes


For more information contact: [email protected]
- Soo-Jin Pak
- Yvette Petillon